• Table of Contents
    • Abstract
    • Keywords
    • Article
      • Mortality and life expectancy
      • Age trajectories of human mortality and the Gompertz law of mortality
      • Rising life expectancy in industrialized countries
      • The history of mortality decline
      • The plateau in late-life mortality
      • The influence of current conditions on age-specific death rates
      • The plasticity of aging
      • Future prospects of longevity
      • Mortality divergences
      • Mortality differentials
    • See Also
    • Bibliography
    • Free internet sources on mortality data
    • How to cite this article

mortality

James W. Vaupel and Kristín G. von Kistowski and Roland Rau
From The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, Second Edition, 2008
Edited by Steven N. Durlauf and Lawrence E. Blume
Back to top

Abstract

Mortality is a demographic component that contributes to shaping the size, structure, and dynamics of populations. Life expectancy has been rising remarkably in the more developed countries since the 19th century and the process of rising life expectancy also has begun in most of the less developed countries. Increases in adult life expectancy and declines in birth rates result in aging societies. Survival is increasing as a result of progress in economic development, social improvements, and advances in medicine. However, death rates vary significantly in different parts of the world and are particularly high in sub-Saharan Africa.
Back to top

Keywords

Back to top

Article

Back to top

How to cite this article

Vaupel, James W., Kristín G. von Kistowski and Roland Rau. "mortality." The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics. Second Edition. Eds. Steven N. Durlauf and Lawrence E. Blume. Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics Online. Palgrave Macmillan. 16 April 2014 <http://www.dictionaryofeconomics.com/article?id=pde2008_M000263> doi:10.1057/9780230226203.1141

Download Citation:

as RIS | as text | as CSV | as BibTex